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ABSTRACT PAINTINGS BY PETER DRANITSIN

ABSTRACT PAINTINGS BY PETER DRANITSIN
acrylic painting of a Grapefruit

Amazing abstract painting techniques

Amazing abstract painting techniques
acrylic and watercolor painting video lesson only at abstractartlesson.com

Monday, May 31, 2010

Learn How to Paint with Acrylics by Peter Dranitsin Video Art Lessons.


In this video I share with you my contemporary techniques where I paint one of my abstract paintings "On the Inside" - contemporary abstract cityscape painting.  Acrylic paintings and techniques have the advantage over other media in that they are long-lasting, yet less costly than oil paintings. Oil and pastels for paintings have drawbacks, pastels being more ephemeral and possibly giving rise to breathing issues due to their chalk residue, and oils for the length of time needed to dry being quite lengthy, perhaps up to months' worth of drying time, as well as the turpentine fumes being bothersome to many. Acrylic paintings are synthetic paint made from pigments blended with synthetic materials. They are water-soluble and can be used on a large range of surfaces; they can be mixed as can oil paints and they clean up easily. In an indoor studio, their smell is less overwhelming than is an oil-based paint. While many artists choose oils because of their opacity, the translucent quality of arcrylic paintings and techniques lend themselves to underpainting, that is, applying a monotone of sorts as a primer. Some artists prefer umber with a touch of black, or even umber mixed with ultramarine blue, after which primary mixing all are mixed with white. Generally, the underpainting is applied in glazes or very thin brushstrokes; when the artist feels comfortable with the underpainting, then the 'fun part' begins, the detailing of the final look of the painting. Why do underpainting? Because the depth and luminosity of color is increased, bringing an inner glow to the finished product. Any self-respecting artist will want the optimal outcome for his hard work. Painting in this layering process can aid the creative energy also, keeping it going strong as an artist has one layer drying in one painting while working on another. The synergy of creativity feeds on itself. The artist may also use acrylics as a range of techniques, from transparent washes to opaque layers, due to the water-solubility of the acrylic medium. This same water-solubility can prove to be a challenge, as acrylics tend to dry faster than the artist can blend to his satisfaction; however, a stay-wet palette solves this problem, enabling the artist to blend his colors and keep them fresh for days at a time. A number of artists use acrylics solely as underpainting, layering the coats until satisfied with their effect on the canvas, then apply oil paints to this rich layer. As you can see, the abstract artist using acrylics has a number of reasons for using this particular medium, but the basics are these: they last, and they can be worked quickly into a work of art. An artist working on commission can speedily predict exactly how much time a piece will take to dry, after the initial work is completed. This is a special bonus for both the artist and the patron as well, as timeframes can be judged accurately and thus allow for the timely distribution of resources. In the art world, pleasing a patron leads to better business practices all around and referrals for future work from the patron and his friends. Acrylics are the medium of choice for the artist and he will illustrate their use as the best medium to his patrons. 

Learn How to Paint with Acrylics by Peter Dranitsin abstract cityscape p...

Learn How to Paint with Acrylics by Peter Dranitsin abstract cityscape art painting on canvas.

Saturday, May 29, 2010

Monday, May 24, 2010

learn how to paint a real abstract painting by PetesOriginalArt.com Pet...

Hi everyone! Finally I was able to record a good quality video of how I create a painting that I really want to share with you all! please watch this video and leave me your comments!

Tuesday, May 18, 2010

Peter's Original Art Abstract Paintings by Peter Dranitsin North Royalton OH, buy abstract art, abstract art, original abstract, modern abstract paintings, original abstract paintings, abstract paintings, cleveland decorative art

Peter's Original Art Abstract Paintings by Peter Dranitsin North Royalton OH, buy abstract art, abstract art, original abstract, modern abstract paintings, original abstract paintings, abstract paintings, cleveland decorative art: "- Sent using Google Toolbar"

What is so Beautiful and Captivating About Floral Abstract Paintings

What is so Beautiful and Captivating About Floral Abstract Paintings? What is one of the first things we dabble in, the first subject that an art instructor at any level assigns?  A still life.  Fruit blossoms, fruit, or the handiest and prettiest of Nature’s subjects, the flower.  A simple daisy, a complex rose, floral paintings touch our souls that cry out for a bit of natural beauty to carry away with us.  Each season offers flowers, from dead-of-winter’s crocuses and snowdrops to spring’s cherry blossoms.  Summer is a riot of rich hues and textures, giving way to autumn’s palette of gold and bronze.  For all things artistic, a flower contains both simple shapes and endlessly complicated spirals.  You may cultivate an interest in further nature studies, or devote yourself to the flowers of the entire world.  It is up to you.
Floral modern abstract art paintings, such as Monet’s impressionistic water lilies, can be on an enormous canvas, or like a small framed miniature floral from India’s Deccan School, exquisitely petite.  Floral art uses all tones, all hues, even green for foliage and black for the background of a night-blooming jasmine’s portrait. Whatever your mood is, it can be matched by a flower’s tint.  Feeling giddy on a bright, sunny day?  Enhance your inner self with a splurge of varicolored wildflowers on a verdant hill, captured by the artist in abstract dabs of undiluted paint.  A romantic evening in store?  One single red rose, simple and pure upon a dark background.  The background of a floral painting may be Monet’s garden pool at Giverny or Homer’s commercial illustrations of fertile fields, but the flowers will be your focal point as you gaze at your very own piece of natural color hanging on your wall.
As an abstract art collector, you may even choose which stage of growth to display: the solemn beginning of a crocus bud’s opening, the completed promise of a full-blown dahlia, the poignancy of the last rose of summer, scattering its spent petals on a parquet floor.  Flowers even have their special connotations per the Victorian code of florigraphy, passed down to us by familiar sayings:  rosemary for remembrance, roses for passion, coreopsis for cheerfulness.
Now on to abstract flowers.  What could be more abstract than a single smidgen of white against a dark green background, one flower plucked out of many to be portrayed in a range – a sliding scale of abstraction – of the artist’s vision, the white flower in exquisite detail, the background a surreal montage of greens, all representing the flower’s foliage?  Or in reverse, the leaves limned to perfection, the flower a mass of white, undifferentiated as if it is in soft focus, as if it grows close enough for its fragrance to be sniffed by the viewer?  When you collect abstract floral original acrylic paintings, you have the option of living in an ever-blooming garden, unspoiled by drought and free of winter’s desolation.  You can wander in and enjoy your flower paintings to your heart’s delight, anytime you wish to escape and wonder at an artist’s talent. 


Seascape Original Abstract Art Paintings Bring New Begging to Our Subconscious Minds.

Seascape Original Abstract Art Paintings Bring New Begging to Our Subconscious Minds.The sea calms us, it stirs us to thoughts of adventures, it pervades our imagination with its limitless horizons.  Who would refuse the gift of a cruise on a beautiful, sun-flecked ocean? Even if you live inland from the sea or are perhaps a desert dweller, when you stand before a seascape, you are entranced.  The endless waves, the spackle of the sun on far-flung foam, you are caught up in the painting.  Already you have thought of a home for it, that certain wall where the painting will provide a break from the humdrum routine of life.  Seascape paintings can do that for our souls.
From the perfectly-captured fisherman in Winslow Homer’s “The Gulf Stream” to Marek Wlodarski’s abstract seascapes of mid-20th century, the sea captures light in ways that other subjects do not.  Light as seen through water, light hitting water and reflecting upon a mysterious seaside cave, what could be more challenging to an artist to portray?  When fashioning seascape paintings, the abstract artist pulls from his palette the muted hues of a dawn sea, the full-out tones of the noontime and the shading into nighttime at purple dusk.  Whoever purchases an abstract seascape can tell at a glance which of these moods of the sea graces the painting.  You will have been glad to have selected such a wide-ranging source of enjoyment.
Why choose a seascape original abstract art painting over other genres of paintings?  Much may depend on the personality of the collector and their resources.  A vacation home near the seashore, for example, cries out for a local painter’s rendition of the same shore at calm neap or full-bore tide.  Different seasons, different times of day, all could render a room into an echo of the natural setting just outside the door of the room.  From the viewpoint of a collector in the midsection of the continent, a seascape will be a memory of a treasured childhood trip, a honeymoon, or a desired retirement spot.  A seascape in a physician’s waiting room, for example, soothes a restless spirit as he gazes into the blues and greens and forgets the reason why he is here.  On the practical side, a seascape may entertain a child as he or she waits upon an appointment. 
These descriptions of seascapes would not be complete without its defining feature, the land.  Water runs down waterfalls from cliffs to the sea, a quite rare phenomenon that begs to be the subject of a painting.  Then there is the more common depiction of wave action upon oceanside rocks, little rills running down the rockface as each wave recedes.  Light is caught at different moments each time.  And what of the drifting spray we see on the point of meeting between water and shore?  Abstract art can even suggest this ephemeral part of the seascape world.  We can see why seascapes are favorite subject for any artist.  When you obtain a seascape for yourself, your art collection gains a prized, time-honored genre as exemplified by Homer and Wlodarski.


Creative Way to Paint Hearts and Angels Reflecting Warms of Love and Devotion.

Creative Way to Paint Hearts and Angels Reflecting Warms of Love and Devotion.Where would we be without it?  It ennobles the simplest lives and when you want to find a unique piece of art that embodies this sentiment, you will not go wrong with abstract art, because the sheer generosity of love can be best expressed in the wide expanses of shape and color that abstract love art does best.  Red, of course, in the shape of a heart, means love, but how about the tinkering that the artist can do with the iconic heart shape.  A warp of the shape and love becomes unstable, a mutable thing that changes with each day’s encounter with the loved one.  A realistic touch, you might say, because love isn’t a solid thing to touch but an emotion to feel, and how often do our emotions stay steady throughout the course of a day?  In regards to mood and color, a pink heart shows a more tender emotion than the fiery red, in that pink is delicate and reminiscent of springtime with its tentative flowerings and the growth of new plants.  If we continue the use of color as metaphor, then a gold heart symbolizes the love that is tried-and-true, the one that has lasted in value just as does gold.  All these symbols for love show up dramatically in an abstract treatment of the subject.
But moving on to the particular object of our love, a portrait done by an abstract artist from a photograph or from an actual sitting could bring joy to a room.  Personal portraits can be done in closeup, a family type studio setting, or even in plain air, using the great outdoors as a backdrop.  The abstract element of love art would be in the artist’s choice of what to emphasize – will it be the glossy hair of the beloved, the grace of a certain well-loved posture, the ghost of a smile?  The elements of a natural background can be used by a canny artist, as well.  Perhaps the mist of a distant waterfall is echoed in the coronet of baby’s breath flowers in a bride’s coiffure.  There is no end to what the artist’s eye can pick up and use as a theme.  So it seems that whether an individual portrait is the aim, or a family portrait, or the portrayal of a beloved pet, the abstract artist will find just the right touch to imbue his work with his personal stamp, a stamp that his commissioner will agree with.
The placement of a piece of love art need not be problematical.  The bedroom is the obvious choice for a piece depicting one’s love, and the individual portrait or the more generalized picture of the ideal of love will enhance one’s bedroom to maximum effect if the hearts and angels original abstract painting painting is placed out of range of ultraviolet rays streaming in from a window, which could damage the finished work over time.  A painting needs to be softly lit and on a wall where it dominates the flat surface.  Sconces containing lighting features are a fascinating way to light a painting, but track lighting will do just as well.  More and more, the use of love art will seem to you to be the ultimate expression of the love of your life.


Monday, May 17, 2010

The Creative Process of Painting Original Acrylic Contemporary Painting on Canvas.

The Creative Process of Painting Original Acrylic Contemporary Painting on Canvas. You’re an unusual type of budding artist:  you want to do everything hands-on!  So you’ve researched on how to make the canvases themselves and are ready to begin.  Making canvas paintings will achieve your goal of creating a piece of art from absolute start to finished work.  Start by thinking of the dimensions you want for this particular painting, and cut the stretcher boards from 1x2 inch boards, utilizing a miter box to get the perfect 45-degree angles for the corners.  Staple the boards together both inside and outside to give it that extra-firm feel that will make painting on it a delight.  To use an expert’s secret, use quarter-round trim to apply a raised lip to the outside edge of the completed stretcher bar, as this will lift the canvas off the stretcher bars and eliminate that awkward line of uneven paint that comes from using cheap canvases which do not use this extra step.  You’ve seen it on paintings that are otherwise lovely; it’s a mark put into the paint by the width of the wood underneath.  Using the trim is a step well worth taking.
Now that you’ve completed your stretcher bars, time to stretch something over them.  You want unprimed canvas, because you’ll later prime it yourself.  Using a staple gun, staple the canvas which has been measured to overlap the dimensions of your bars by an inch or two, and work your way from the middle of one side of canvas to each end of that side.  Pulling firmly, staple the other side in the same way.  Then do the ends, and voila!  You have nearly completed making a canvas for your artwork.  Tuck down each corner, staple and trim the excess and you’re done.  Now onto the priming --- it’s easy with gesso watered down to a thin consistency.  Working under a bright light to show up any uncovered spots, with a housepaint brush cover the canvas evenly, not forgetting the sides.  You’ll want a smooth basis for your work, after all!  Let it dry, give it a second coat to make sure it’s truly smooth, dry and get right to painting.
What should you use to hold your acrylic paints?  An inexpensive palette is a sheet of glass, safely protected at its edges.  Each time you finish using it, let the acrylic paint dry, and then scrape it off with a glass scraper.  It will be set for the next time you are inspired to paint.  Then there is the big question, acrylics or oils, but honestly, the advantages are for the acrylics at this stage of the beginning artist game.  Acrylics dry faster and are cheaper to use and thus experimenting will not make you look worriedly at your checkbook.  So go for the acrylics and make your vision come true.
Acrylics dry quicker than oil paints, require only soap and water cleanup, and if you begin by using acrylics, your technique will grow solidly and surely into becoming part of your repertoire as an artist.  You may or may not move onto oils, but for sure your painting will be one that you personally have constructed from stretcher bar to the last layer of paint.  You can be proud of your expertise in making canvas paintings.


Hi everyone, my name is Peter Dranitsin. I am a self representing artist from Cleveland Ohio. I grew up in a family where my mother is a professional artist and my father is a professional photographer. I have been painting professionally since 2006 and this is all I do. In my abstract art video lesson tutorials I will demonstrate different modern techniques that I personally use myself when creating abstract paintings, as well as variety of different tools you will need to create an amazing, eye catching acrylic abstract paintings. I truly hope that you will enjoy watching!

Original modern and contemporary abstract art video lessons by Peter Dranitsin. All videos are copyright protected.

Perfecting Your Techniques Painting Original Modern Cityscape Abstract Art Paintings

Modern Cityscape Abstract Painting called "Tell Me More" painted in 2010 on 36x18 inch professionally stretched canvas signed by me. This painting is a cityscape reflecting in the water. 

What should you use to hold your acrylic paints?  An inexpensive palette is a sheet of glass, safely protected at its edges.  Each time you finish using it, let the acrylic paint dry, and then scrape it off with a glass scraper.  It will be set for the next time you are inspired to paint.  Then there is the big question, acrylics or oils, but honestly, the advantages are for the acrylics at this stage of the beginning artist game.  Acrylics dry faster and are cheaper to use and thus experimenting will not make you look worriedly at your checkbook.  So go for the acrylics and make your vision come true.

Acrylics dry quicker than oil paints, require only soap and water cleanup, and if you begin by using acrylics, your technique will grow solidly and surely into becoming part of your repertoire as an artist.  You may or may not move onto oils, but for sure your painting will be one that you personally have constructed from stretcher bar to the last layer of paint.  You can be proud of your expertise in making canvas paintings.


Sunday, May 16, 2010

Today We Paint Original Acrylic Modern Cityscape Abstract Art Painting On Canvas

In this video I painted original acrylic painting of a cityscape. I share with you what materials I personally used in this art video lesson presentation and how I used those materials. I hope you enjoy!

Describing the Beauty of Original Landscape Abstract Art Modern Painting

Describing the Beauty of Original Landscape Abstract Art Modern Painting.  A landscape brings us to the great outdoors even if we are busy indoors, working or relaxing, chatting with friends or reviewing an important business deal.  How inspiring it is to see the panorama of all that nature can offer, whether it is a stormy patch of weather which overhangs a mountaintop or the broad vista of cultivated fields that shows how much that mankind is dependent upon the land for our very existence.  Now and again an outstanding element comes to the fore, but in the main the emphasis in landscape paintings is the land itself, unending around us as our vision takes in the horizon stretching all around us.  From the ancient Minoans, Greeks and Romans come the first inklings that landscapes formed part of their culture, and even though the more sophisticated means of portraying scale and proportion regarding distance would not come until the Renaissance, these extremely early landscapes do show an attempt to recreate the feel of standing still and really noticing the land around us.  Working our way through history to the Dutch Masters, we see that landscape painting in the West has come to fruition with the complete understanding of the ideas of distance and perception and how to portray them in paintings.
Landscape paintings in Chinese traditional art focus upon mountains and generally show only the minimal presence of people, for instance the lone traveler leaning on his staff or perhaps even more simply, the indication of human beings represented by the hermit’s hut far atop a mountain.  For the problems of how to show intervening land between the distant mountain and the figure in the foreground, these Chinese scrolls emphasized the vertical canvas as the painters used the devices of fog obscuring the details of the landscape, or implying the intervening land as a simple ground line.  What the Chinese landscapes lacked in formal knowledge of vanishing points and horizon depictions, they made up for in the exquisite detail of each pine tree and even each pine needle.  The two schools of landscape paintings each fill a niche, as they both demonstrate traditions going back well over one thousand years.
What of imaginary landscapes?  Why should we be limited to the scenes that we or others have seen with their own eyes?  The works of the engraver Dore are a case in point.  Fantastic scenes from the works of Poe, Milton, Ariosto and other romantic writers come to light as nearly realistic, since the attention to detail that Dore infuses into each engraving and painting transcends our sense as a viewer that what we are seeing cannot possibly be real.  The sea monster of Orlando Furioso or the outer space scene of a chariot carrying characters from the earth to the moon could not have been imagined more thoroughly as they have in Dore’s works.  All painters of imaginary landscapes after Dore owe him a great deal.
Landscape paintings take us where we have been and might go.  If you include one in your home or office, you will give your visitors and yourself a flight into fancy as the painting takes you to the great outdoors, either real life-based or springing from the imagination of a fabulous artist.


Saturday, May 15, 2010

Impressionists and Its Connection to the Abstract Art Paintings.

From the first week of the debut of the Impressionists in the spring of 1874, the term ‘impressionism’ gained favor and spread quickly throughout the art world.  Impressionism has a sensual immediacy to the viewer, far from the static nature of a portrait or even the lush tones of a still life of red apples.  Impressionism became so important to the world of art that a prominent patron and a fine Impressionist himself, Gustave Caillebotte, subsidized his more financially-stressed colleagues and provided generously for exhibitions of this new artistic mode.  And why should Impressionism gain such high regard?  In the beginning, Impressionism was criticized as ‘brutal’ and ‘lacking in skill.’  As time passed, however, the themes of high romance and fantasy in the earlier part of the 19th century subsided and the everyday scenes of Impressionism prevailed.  These scenes of bathers on the beach, picnickers at ease on a Sunday greensward and workers toiling in a railroad yard provided an almost photographic record of the lives of the people in the latter quarter of the century.  Impressionism can also be said to be a political movement away from the sensibilities of the upper classes with their emphasis on historic nobility and fanciful subjects.  Moving strongly towards the working class’ emphasis on light and ephemeral pastimes in the midst of lifelong toil, the politics of the art world turned towards collectivism and a celebration of the greater majority of human existence.
We’ve all thought about artists in studios, but Impressionism emphasized the advantages of working in plain air, that is, the outdoors: the flesh tints of a model keep their true qualities because they are nearly equally lit on all sides, while artificial light in a studio may force that feature which the light strikes into undue relief and thus be untrue to its subject.  Open air painting also has the advantage of exposing artists to a more social environment and enabling them to expound on their techniques to any onlookers, which may even aid artists in clearing their own heads about their goals.  Conversely, open air painters may inspire onlookers to take up painting themselves.  Certainly art is removed from the mystery of the studio and shown to be attainable even by the humblest of students.
Impressionism remains in a vaunted place in art history, replacing the art schools’ highly disciplined techniques with sketchlike brushwork, a lack of conventional drawing as well as modeling and composition and, especially, unconventionally bright, juxtaposed hues.  The emphasis is placed, therefore, not on the photographic depiction of a sunrise but of the artist’s sensation of nature, the way that the sun gradually reveals the world it left behind with the previous dusk.  Subjectively, the artist paints his impression of the sunrise and if you wish to include this impressionistic painting in your home or office, you are paying homage to a uniquely individual artistic view of the world.  Your impressionistic painting will show to your guests or clients that you value individualism in the conformist world of today.  You will be proven right in your choice of art.  



Where to Find the Best Modern Abstract Art Original Online Gallery.

Where to Find the Best Modern Abstract Art Original Online Gallery. Perhaps as a child, your parents took you to an art gallery as an outing.  You were amazed and a little bit awed by the range of the art depicted.  So much of it seemed unintelligible to you and the parts that didn’t delighted you, but the experience was overwhelming.  As an adult with the option of buying a piece of art yourself, this awe of the artistic world will stand you in good stead.  But now, since you reached adulthood, the responsibilities of adulthood are not those of a child.  Now, you have to work and provide for your family and time spent as a child in reading or simply inviting your soul to enjoy art is extremely limited.  That is where an online modern art gallery comes in.  With the ease of the internet, a website is more than an art gallery: it is a design school, a chance to interact via email or comments with the artist himself, and a website changes the more onerous aspects of making a purchase of art, such as arranging for packing and shipping and actually paying for the purchase, a mere click away.  How different than it seemed to you as a child!  Nowadays, you can choose the painting you like, place it in a setting similar to your own living room or kitchen or bedroom, and see for yourself how the effect looks.  Some people even like to go further, and choose not from a finished painting, but commission a piece of art themselves, perhaps sending a photograph of the setting that they want to enhance.  The artist, using these guidelines, constructs a painting scheme and confers with you, you approve and the work begins.  The artist considers your color scheme, the subject and the size of the desired painting and using all these criteria, within a week or two he has brought your idea to vivid life.  What a marvelous way to do business!
Should you be overwhelmed with the sheer variety of art, a search engine will prune your choices to a manageable list.  Do you like nature art, those pieces bringing a bit of our natural world into your home or office?  Then there are the subcategories of animal art, floral art, seascapes and the like.  All you need do is cruise the internet, circle in on which subjects meet your fancy, and go from there.  It could be that you enjoy the famous touches of a Picasso or the surreal quality of a Dali.  Then what you need to do is start a list of your favorite artists, and a commissioned piece will be yours to hang in your environment sooner than you think.  The online modern art gallery can fill your every artistic need, and the artist will be more than happy to guide you in the unfamiliar pathways of obtaining a piece of art of which you can be proud.
The online modern art gallery has an extra added attraction:  it is convenient!  You do not need to struggle into a vehicle, find a place to park and worry about the parking meter’s timing out.  You may shop from the comfort of your own home and suit the painting to your immediate environment, perhaps thinking out loud as you do so, coming up with ideas as your mind floats freely.  It is up to you to choose your shopping methods, but for my money, an online modern art gallery can’t be beat.


Looking for an Animal Abstract Art Painting Original Acrylic Work on Canvas.

Looking for an Animal Abstract Art Painting Original Acrylic Work on Canvas. From our first picture books in babyhood, we learn about animals.  How many times have we visited the zoo, observing our similarities and differences with our animal cousins?  Learning about animals is a lifelong study for some, and a hobby or source of income for others.  For many of us, animal paintings bring a living, breathing source of life into our homes.  Moving from Asia to Africa, acrylic paintings in the abstract style can capture a tiger’s striped majesty or a shy gazelle’s wide-eyed gaze.  Nor are we limited to our far-flung lands, for the birds of our skies and fish in our seas sport colors in all shades of the spectrum.  Any color that would complement your wall’s decorating scheme can be found in nature and transferred to a ready-to-hang canvas by an abstract artist.  Why don’t you stroll through your home after you have thought about your favorite members of the animal kingdom?  The perfect mood of your favorite creature will spring to mind, and you will have taken the first step to procuring a new piece of art to decorate your home.  Now, on to making your dream a reality.
You need to get a feel for your favorite subject, so you shop online through many galleries, at last selecting your animal subject in the pose and background that you desire.  Is it a lion in muted tans and beiges, golden against the backdrop of the savannah?  Then your room will acquire a sense of anticipation, the waiting for something exciting to happen as the lion decides which creature to stalk.  Or is your favorite a fish, twisting in the unfamiliar air as it leaps free of the water to pursue its dinner or to escape from an underwater predator?  Then the mood is action-filled, thriving with life and the drama that nature brings.  A bird subject with a backdrop of blue sky will lift your spirits as the wind lifts the bird to wing.
So, your painting is ready in your mind, it’s in your hand, it’s ready to hang.  Look around you; does the mood and color of the piece match your room’s décor?  Perfect!   The abstract technique of painting fur may provide a pleasant surprise to your room’s colors as fur has copious amounts of various hues, blended to realism by a masterly hand: red, yellow, brown, white and black, and each of these colors you may pick up in furnishings or small decorative elements such as pillows and draperies.  You may switch out these touches of color to suit your mood or the season, as at Christmastime the red accent pillows may follow your holiday decorating theme.  At Easter, the white of the Eastertime lilies may bring that season to life in your home.  So many varied color schemes to choose from when you decorate with animal paintings!  A final note on the decorating suggestion of animal paintings: an artist may reproduce that faithful childhood pet’s portrait on a commission for you and then you will remember the warm feelings you experienced as a child when your animal friend greeted you after each schoolday.  Simply another good reason to choose original abstract art animal paintings for your home!


Wednesday, May 12, 2010

Take a Journey through Modern Cityscape Abstract Art Paintings Gallery.

Take a Journey through Modern Cityscape Abstract Art Paintings Gallery. It is a fact of life that cities attract people.  The bright lights of the nighttime cityscape, the hustle and bustle of the daytime activities, the sheer multiplicity of things to do and enjoy make even the most rural and suburban dwellers drive the long distance to revel in their nearest big city.  Even if you life inside the city, you will cherish cityscape paintings, because they paint a picture of your daily life.  Someday you will want to have a legacy of your life, when the time comes to relax after the labors of a career and look around at the culture you have displayed in your home.  Wouldn’t you want a cityscape to visit in your imagination?
Cityscape paintings come in varied modes.  By the nature of the geometric shapes that stand out so well in cityscapes, a piece of geometrical art would go nicely in mood and theme with your choice of subject.  An odd shape such as the Sutro Tower in San Francisco could be the focal point of a cityscape, as could the Coit Tower profile, in that most of the apartment buildings and business edifices are rectangular.  Anything dissimilar distinguishes itself and thus the cityscape artist would wisely choose an obtrusive shape to form a painting around.  Of course, the cityscape contains plant life, too, and some city parks are green enough to qualify as an oasis in the midst of asphalt and concrete structures.  Cityscapes take on a shining quality in a light rainfall or snowfall, and the nighttime city in the rain manages to look deeply mysterious, as if the alleys hide all sorts of attractions.  There are other climate depictions that an artist will use in his artistic vision, such as fog, but a rainy cityscape is a classic.
Would you prefer your cityscape to be of an ancient city, such as Rome?  There is no need to limit yourself to present-day cityscapes, since historical findings indicate a great deal of detail about the way that people lived in cities going all the way back to when there were first congregates of people living in what could be termed a city, most likely in ancient Mesopotamia.  A unique quality of cities is that they resemble an enormous home in macrostructure:  garbage collection, a system of government, a plan for growth and a means of transportation all exist in a city, the same as they do for an individual’s home.  Any one of these criteria could be the subject of a cityscape, for instance a colorful city bus, decorated with advertising banners on its side as it makes its way downtown would make for a lively cityscape.  Or how about where the sidewalk ends and the city loses its character even as the rural landscape takes over?  That theme would be remarkable and the artist who painted it would surely be acclaimed for his sensitivity for the poignancy depicted.
From ancient cities such as Damascus to modern-day ones such as Abu Dhabi, the remarkable thing about cities is the way that they command respect and a large number of return visits.  No one, it seems, is immune to the lure of the bright city lights.


Abstract Paintings That Speak of Love and Emotions.

Abstract Paintings That Speak of Love and Emotions.  It ennobles the simplest lives and when you want to find a unique piece of art that embodies this sentiment, you will not go wrong with abstract art, because the sheer generosity of love can be best expressed in the wide expanses of shape and color that abstract love art does best.  Red, of course, in the shape of a heart, means love, but how about the tinkering that the artist can do with the iconic heart shape.  A warp of the shape and love becomes unstable, a mutable thing that changes with each day’s encounter with the loved one.  A realistic touch, you might say, because love isn’t a solid thing to touch but an emotion to feel, and how often do our emotions stay steady throughout the course of a day?  In regards to mood and color, a pink heart shows a more tender emotion than the fiery red, in that pink is delicate and reminiscent of springtime with its tentative flowerings and the growth of new plants.  If we continue the use of color as metaphor, then a gold heart symbolizes the love that is tried-and-true, the one that has lasted in value just as does gold.  All these symbols for love show up dramatically in an abstract treatment of the subject.
But moving on to the particular object of our love, a portrait done by an abstract artist from a photograph or from an actual sitting could bring joy to a room.  Personal portraits can be done in closeup, a family type studio setting, or even in plain air, using the great outdoors as a backdrop.  The abstract element of love art would be in the artist’s choice of what to emphasize – will it be the glossy hair of the beloved, the grace of a certain well-loved posture, the ghost of a smile?  The elements of a natural background can be used by a canny artist, as well.  Perhaps the mist of a distant waterfall is echoed in the coronet of baby’s breath flowers in a bride’s coiffure.  There is no end to what the artist’s eye can pick up and use as a theme.  So it seems that whether an individual portrait is the aim, or a family portrait, or the portrayal of a beloved pet, the abstract artist will find just the right touch to imbue his work with his personal stamp, a stamp that his commissioner will agree with.
The placement of a piece of love art need not be problematical.  The bedroom is the obvious choice for a piece depicting one’s love, and the individual portrait or the more generalized picture of the ideal of love will enhance one’s bedroom to maximum effect if the painting is placed out of range of ultraviolet rays streaming in from a window, which could damage the finished work over time.  A painting needs to be softly lit and on a wall where it dominates the flat surface.  Sconces containing lighting features are a fascinating way to light a painting, but track lighting will do just as well.  More and more, the use of love art will seem to you to be the ultimate expression of the love of your life.


Exploring New Ideas for Abstract Art Paintings.

Exploring New Ideas for Abstract Art Paintings. Ideas for abstract paintings are as numerous as clouds in a winter sky, skittering across the landscape of our mind’s eye.  In fact, they may even get away if you do not write them down!  So far, there is no immediate way of painting what our mind holds directly onto the canvas, so we must use the middle man of the artist’s skills.  The artist may even be ourselves, but whoever winds up doing the final version of someone’s artistic vision, that person will have had a grounding education in abstract painting.  Form and color, texture and execution, the painting that is abstract may speak more easily to the viewer than a representational painting, because these elements touch our emotions more directly than with the intervening persona of the mind, which must interpret each figure in a representational piece in a time-consuming way.  An abstract painting goes right for the inner core of the viewer.
Do you have a favorite color?  Then the general wisdom is to discard that favorite in lieu of another color.  You may use your absolute favorite in small doses on the painting or as a trim color in the room in which your painting resides, because to overwhelm your scheme for your painting with your favorite color runs the very real risk of making you bored with that color, and you don’t want that.  By keeping it to a minimum, you preserve the favorite as sort of a surprise treat, which is an old trick used by experienced interior decorators.  Rest assured, you will have the expert advice of an artist and will not make any wrong steps in choosing the form of your color scheme.  Ideas for abstract paintings will spring forth from both of you, creating a synergy that is most productive.
The search for shapes to use in an abstract painting can be as simple as searching the internet for a set of photos of the natural world.  Rather than identifying what the object is, look for shapes that speak to you as you simplify the elements in the photograph, alternate colors or focus on a small part of the image.  It’s easier to begin with something ‘real’ as the basis for an abstract painting than it is to start from scratch.  Consider the spiral of a seashell and work from there, perhaps thinking of it as a tiny maze, a way into the very core of the shell.  Who knows what we’ll find there?
It’s done, you have the idea.  Now how to implement it?  Do you commission a painting from a reputable artist or take on the delightful task of recreating your vision yourself?  After making the decision and gathering your strength to firm your resolve, start out boldly.  Do you see it as a large piece, a small piece or a framed or un-framed piece?  If you take on this aspect a little bit at a time, it will not overwhelm you and you will feel more in control.  And the finished art will have gotten all the attention it deserved from when it first sparked in your artistic mind.


Looking to an Open Sky in Search for Ideas of Outerspace Abstract Art Paintings.

Looking to an Open Sky in Search for Ideas of Outerspace Abstract Art Paintings. Outer space captures our imaginations as do few other subjects.  Just what is ‘out there’ and will we voyage beyond the moon to other planets in solar systems far beyond ours?  The future holds the hope of mankind and in our sincere wish to explore all the possibilities that life brings, we find ourselves dreaming of outer space paintings.  Perhaps they formed a part of our infant strivings towards art, when we learned of differing shapes: the crescent moon, the five-pointed star, the sunburst.  Certainly when we discerned enough about our immediate environment, outer space formed the environment that was not immediate, the one that we yearned to visit.  Only in our imaginations could we do this, save for the fortunate few who have escaped the bounds of gravity and have drifted in extra-vehicular activity while orbiting our earth.  Those people have brought back tales of the clarity of their surroundings, the utter peace of quiet and the inspiring view of earth from thousands of miles up.  The men who have walked on the moon have our utmost admiration, as they have seen and done things we only dream about.
Outer space paintings allow us to indulge our fantasy lives, as well as our budding scientific inquiries.  How often does the iconic painting of Bonestell’s “Saturn As Seen From Titan” spring to mind, as we go about our daily tasks and look for inspiration among the chores?  If only we could go there, we think, fly there somehow and stand upon Titan as we gaze in awe at the rings of Saturn.  If we owned a giclee print of his groundbreaking work, we would hang it in a place of honor in our home.  How much more distinguished would be an abstract painting based upon Bonestell’s image, fashioned with brush and paint and spread out widely upon a canvas that we can brush with our fingers to feel the texture of the work.  More precious than a print, it would be, and we know we would sacrifice a great deal to own such a piece.
Should you be an amateur artist, you may commission an outer space painting. Don’t be shy!  Take your sketch or simple idea to a reputable artist and let him see the idea through to fruition.  He may even have some input of his own and when you look upon the finished result, you will see the advantages of the synergy created between the two of you.  The painting will satisfy your every urge to own a piece of original art and when you hang it in the place of honor, you will point it out with pride to your guests, because you had the impetus and dream within you and needed only the helping hand of the professional artist.
Outer space paintings are varied enough to suit anyone interested in the genre.  For the technological enthusiast, there are the detailed works showing the space shuttles, Mir space station, lunar landing modules, and these exist as a sub-group.  Another sub-group is the exotic planet paintings, those depicting wildly luxuriant jungles on named but unexplored planets, as well as barren moons where the only way that human beings could live there would be in biodomes.  For the truly adventurous, an outer space painting couldn’t feel more natural on the wall of your home or office.  Choose one style for each area of your home and feed your impulse to daydream about space flight.  Surely there is an artist whose work will complement your décor.  


A Gift of Nature is Reflected on Canvas as an Floral Abstract Art Painting.

A Gift of Nature is Reflected on Canvas as an Floral Abstract Art Painting. How indicative of nature is a floral painting.  The cheer and symbolism of flowers can be expressed very easily with a red rose for love, a yellow daffodil to symbolize the rebirth of spring and the  waterlily to make one reminiscent of the floral paintings of Monet at Giverny.  It could be a hillside of wildflowers, it could be the cultured gardens of Versailles or the wild beauty of a jungle bloom painted by Rousseau, all the moods that flowers can convey can be expressed in a painting that you choose for a certain area in your home or office.  For the office, a decorator suggests a wide painting of multiple flowers, because there are varying tastes in your employees, each according to his taste.  Almost a bouquet of flowers would be an appropriate subject, or you can go the eclectic route and choose a painting of a flower show itself, which would account for the greater variety and closeness than is found in nature.  Floral paintings of a single flower go best in smaller spaces such as a reading nook, where the clarity of purpose that a reading nook implies can best be complemented by a single, simple subject for a work of art.
Floral paintings can come in all shades that are found in nature, or, if one follows a fairy-tale or fantastic theme, the colors can be supernatural, such as a pure blue rose.  Something of this nature will even be a conversation starter, so perhaps you should choose wisely your subject: a supernatural flower in a kitchen painting, for instance, may distract visitors from the good food that you are providing!  Along with a floral painting in a foyer, for example, can stand a vase of real flowers on a pedestal, perhaps as a means to show admiration for the artist’s technique in capturing the essence of the flower.  In abstract paintings, floral subjects may be suggested by a swirl of petal or a hint of rippling fern leaf, and the mind of the viewer supplies the rest.  Even a blaze of color in an expressionistic work of art may indicate a field of poppies, nodding in the spring breeze as they decorate a green hillside.  Many are the uses of an abstract floral painting.
Why not paint a floral work yourself?  Since flowers are by their very nature here today and gone tomorrow, you may have a favorite bloom that you nurtured to maturity yourself in your garden and be reluctant to give it back to the ravages of time.  So, drag out your easel and paints or watercolors and get down to it!  Your flower can stay in the ground, you can pluck it or you can photograph it, any way that is easiest for you to capture its beauty.  If you like its hue and shadings at dawn, get up earlier than usual and see how it looks when the first rays of the sun tint it.  Snap its picture then and go from there as you use the photo for a model.  Floral paintings make us cheery and that is worth some effort to bring their beauty into your home or office.


Tuesday, May 11, 2010

Abstract Art Paintings that has been Signed by Fire.

Abstract Art Paintings that has been Signed by Fire. Fire heats our passions to a white-hot flame and fire art seeks to share that feeling in its depiction of the phenomenon of fire.  Fire art may be on a canvas as an abstract work, it may be pubic work in the form of fire festivals such as the Burning Man Festival held Labor Day Weekend annually, or in lesser-known venues such as the Art and Fire Project in Wisconsin.  Each painting or public art display has this in common:  the actual need for fire in our lives, as we need an external focus to bring out the passion that we all have inside ourselves.  That passion may be diluted by the workaday world that we all must strive to make a living in, or it may be dragged down by life’s bitter circumstances, but whatever the reason, fire consumes the reasons for our downcast attitude and makes us sit up and take notice of the fact that life is good and worth living.  Should you paint a fire scene yourself, you will notice that the reds and oranges and yellows will be used up quickly; if you use black for a background to make the contrast between the fire and the surrounding darkness deeper, your dark tones of paint will diminish rapidly, too.  No matter --- when your piece is completed, it will all have been worth it, to have an eternally-burning fire hanging on your office or home wall, lighting up your day with inspiration.
Finding a public display of fire art means searching for like-minded souls who also don’t mind traveling a bit, because by its very nature, outdoor fire art needs air and plenty of space around, for safety’s sake.  So be prepared to journey to a farm or expanse of wilderness, because a festival will enable many of your fellow enthusiasts to join you as you enjoy a rousing display of fire art.
Fire art also includes such magnificent displays as the lantern displays of the Art and Fire Lantern Festival in Wisconsin, due to be spectacular from the efforts of the sponsoring artists, but also from the plain ordinary citizens who construct paper lanterns in various workshops in the several hours’ worth of effort that it takes to produce a lantern.  Far from arduous, the only limits on the lantern-making process are those of design, as a small one-square-foot lantern made of wet-strength tissue paper and glue with a framework of rattan will take perhaps an hour or two to construct, while a more ambitious project of a nearly full-size elephant will take six or more hours.  As your lantern takes shape and the day wanes, your excitement will build!  Then the evening arrives and all the lanterns that your fire art comrades have built will flicker to glow with quiet beauty.  It will be a magical evening and when it is over, you have the choice of bringing your lantern back home with you or joining in the communal burn as you watch your lantern burn with all the others to ash and consider the ephemeral quality of life’s efforts.   This will not make you sad, but will enliven your creative processes and  make you plant the next display of fire art, because it answers a primal need, that of driving away darkness and joining in a community drive for excellence.


How Many Hearts and Faces Can you See In this Abstract Art Painting.

In this Abstract Art Video Lesson I will share with you the process of creating an amazing acrylic effect using multiple colors shapes and tones. The idea was to create hearts and faces and make it abstract where a viewer would have to search and see how many hearts and faces they can find in this painting called "How Many Hears and Faces".


How Does Floral Abstract Art Influence our Conceptual View on Original Art.

What is one of the first things we dabble in, the first subject that an art instructor at any level assigns?  A still life.  Fruit blossoms, fruit, or the handiest and prettiest of Nature’s subjects, the flower.  A simple daisy, a complex rose, floral paintings touch our souls that cry out for a bit of natural beauty to carry away with us.  Each season offers flowers, from dead-of-winter’s crocuses and snowdrops to spring’s cherry blossoms.  Summer is a riot of rich hues and textures, giving way to autumn’s palette of gold and bronze.  For all things artistic, a flower contains both simple shapes and endlessly complicated spirals.  You may cultivate an interest in further nature studies, or devote yourself to the flowers of the entire world.  It is up to you.
Floral art, such as Monet’s impressionistic water lilies, can be on an enormous canvas, or like a small framed miniature floral from India’s Deccan School, exquisitely petite.  Floral art uses all tones, all hues, even green for foliage and black for the background of a night-blooming jasmine’s portrait. Whatever your mood is, it can be matched by a flower’s tint.  Feeling giddy on a bright, sunny day?  Enhance your inner self with a splurge of varicolored wildflowers on a verdant hill, captured by the artist in abstract dabs of undiluted paint.  A romantic evening in store?  One single red rose, simple and pure upon a dark background.  The background of a floral painting may be Monet’s garden pool at Giverny or Homer’s commercial illustrations of fertile fields, but the flowers will be your focal point as you gaze at your very own piece of natural color hanging on your wall.
As an abstract art collector, you may even choose which stage of growth to display: the solemn beginning of a crocus bud’s opening, the completed promise of a full-blown dahlia, the poignancy of the last rose of summer, scattering its spent petals on a parquet floor.  Flowers even have their special connotations per the Victorian code of florigraphy, passed down to us by familiar sayings:  rosemary for remembrance, roses for passion, coreopsis for cheerfulness.
Now on to abstract flowers.  What could be more abstract than a single smidgen of white against a dark green background, one flower plucked out of many to be portrayed in a range – a sliding scale of abstraction – of the artist’s vision, the white flower in exquisite detail, the background a surreal montage of greens, all representing the flower’s foliage?  Or in reverse, the leaves limned to perfection, the flower a mass of white, undifferentiated as if it is in soft focus, as if it grows close enough for its fragrance to be sniffed by the viewer?  When you collect abstract floral paintings, you have the option of living in an ever-blooming garden, unspoiled by drought and free of winter’s desolation.  You can wander in and enjoy your flower paintings to your heart’s delight, anytime you wish to escape and wonder at an artist’s talent. 


Observing Animals and Using Observation Ideas for your Next Original Acrylic Abstract Art Painting.

From our first picture books in babyhood, we learn about animals.  How many times have we visited the zoo, observing our similarities and differences with our animal cousins?  Learning about animals is a lifelong study for some, and a hobby or source of income for others.  For many of us, animal abstract art paintings bring a living, breathing source of life into our homes.  Moving from Asia to Africa, acrylic paintings in the abstract style can capture a tiger’s striped majesty or a shy gazelle’s wide-eyed gaze.  Nor are we limited to our far-flung lands, for the birds of our skies and fish in our seas sport colors in all shades of the spectrum.  Any color that would complement your wall’s decorating scheme can be found in nature and transferred to a ready-to-hang canvas by an abstract artist.  Why don’t you stroll through your home after you have thought about your favorite members of the animal kingdom?  The perfect mood of your favorite creature will spring to mind, and you will have taken the first step to procuring a new piece of art to decorate your home.  Now, on to making your dream a reality.
You need to get a feel for your favorite subject, so you shop online through many galleries, at last selecting your animal subject in the pose and background that you desire.  Is it a lion in muted tans and beiges, golden against the backdrop of the savannah?  Then your room will acquire a sense of anticipation, the waiting for something exciting to happen as the lion decides which creature to stalk.  Or is your favorite a fish, twisting in the unfamiliar air as it leaps free of the water to pursue its dinner or to escape from an underwater predator?  Then the mood is action-filled, thriving with life and the drama that nature brings.  A bird subject with a backdrop of blue sky will lift your spirits as the wind lifts the bird to wing.
So, your painting is ready in your mind, it’s in your hand, it’s ready to hang.  Look around you; does the mood and color of the piece match your room’s décor?  Perfect!   The abstract technique of painting fur may provide a pleasant surprise to your room’s colors as fur has copious amounts of various hues, blended to realism by a masterly hand: red, yellow, brown, white and black, and each of these colors you may pick up in furnishings or small decorative elements such as pillows and draperies.  You may switch out these touches of color to suit your mood or the season, as at Christmastime the red accent pillows may follow your holiday decorating theme.  At Easter, the white of the Eastertime lilies may bring that season to life in your home.  So many varied color schemes to choose from when you decorate with animal paintings!  A final note on the decorating suggestion of animal paintings: an artist may reproduce that faithful childhood pet’s portrait on a commission for you and then you will remember the warm feelings you experienced as a child when your animal friend greeted you after each schoolday.  Simply another good reason to choose animal paintings for your home!



Creating Contemporary Style with Original Abstract Art Paintings Tips, Ideas, Decoration Advice.

This is the day you decide to redecorate your personal space with original abstract art paintings.  It could be a study, the communal living room, or the most private place of all, the bedroom.  Even the bathroom could do with a piece of art, you say to yourself.  Now on to the decisions spurred on by your prodigious reading of so many decoration tips.  Perhaps you have an outsized living room with a grand view of the ocean, but if you’re like the rest of us, your windows show an ordinary view of your neighborhood.  Not that you’d have it any other way, of course; you like living in your neighborhood.  But you want to frame your private living space a bit better with an eye to your personality, though also with an eye to the ambience of your neighborhood.  If you live in the artists’ quarter of a city, it would be easy to get informed opinions about what to hang on your walls, but most of us do not have the option of such knowledgeable sources.  So we tweak our minds and come up with our basic desires:  Is it to be an informal mood, with paintings of intimate gatherings or happy splashes of color?  Is it to be a more formal setting, with magnificent vistas in the paintings, or an historical event flung upon a large canvas?  Abstract art can address these issues, for abstract art conveys in a manner universal to us and to unborn generations the pure quality of form and color to influence a person’s mood.  If it’s a seascape with sweeps of azure and turquoise and spiraling waves coming right at the viewer from the canvas, then that mood will reflect an admiration for nature and its grand scheme of life.  If it’s a portrait of an individual with vivacious red hair, then that brightness will bring out the liveliness inside the viewer’s own character. 
You’ve decided on the mood you want for your space.  You’ve reread your decoration tips list.  Now onwards to the specifics.  For a small area such as a bathroom, a petite canvas of perhaps eighteen inches square will produce a window effect, letting in the distraction of a piece of art to look at while we attend to the necessary bits of life.    For the larger area of the master bedroom, perhaps you have room for a large four by three feet canvas, and want to direct all the attention to this work of art; in that case, you will want to limit your artwork to this single piece in order not to overwhelm the senses with too many things to view.  Lighting is key here, as the overhead lighting is perfect to enhance the artist’s handiwork and allows the piece to stand away from any damaging ultraviolet rays of the sun.  Besides, the wrong kind of glare will obscure the depth of the artwork’s colors and render it flat with a dull sheen, not its optimal presentation.  No, you want the artwork to speak to you as you contemplate going out into the world from your bedroom in the morning or as you head back into the bedroom for a soothing and renewing repose.  A few small knickknacks would not be out of place in this most intimate setting of all, but the important thing to remember is ‘few’, as too much clutter confuses the mind and spirit.
As for the common areas such as living rooms or dining areas, what you are needing is not repose but a related subject to the function of the room, such as happy picnickers from the style of Manet for the kitchen area.  And how about a conversation piece for the more chatty living room, such as a piece inspired by the geometric expressionism of Diebenkorn?  Abstract art, because of its emotional resonance, can add a great deal to the culture of your home by influencing discourse on the nature of the artistic piece.
There, you’re done.  Each personal space resonates with your personality and the desired mood for the room.  Time to relax and enjoy life! 


Amazing Abstract Paintings Online Art Gallery by Peter Dranitsin

Amazing Abstract Paintings Online Art Gallery by Peter Dranitsin
Buy Original Acrylic Paintings directly from artist Peter Dranitsin through his online art gallery

Free Art Gallery Customized Widgets

Free Art Gallery Customized Widgets
Create your own art gallery, and generate your own customized widgets to post to your blogs or other websites

Abstract Art Video Lessons

Abstract Art Video Lessons
abstract art video lessons by Peter Dranitsin

Making every part of your painting worth looking at

If your aim is to provide a painting with focal point, you must also make sure that the rest of the piece is worth exploring. You can create subtlety with layers, partially obscured shapes, and lines. Add small, perhaps paler, shapes that echo the dominant shape. If the focal point is heavily textured, have other areas lesser texture that are nevertheless interesting. Experiment with neutrals which have undertone of color.

Display Your Painting in Virtual Room Softwre

Display Your Painting in Virtual Room Softwre
upload multiple images of your paintings into virtual rooms and get a professional looking images that you can use to advertise your artwork

Painting Video Lessons

Painting Video Lessons
painting video lessons by Peter Dranitsin

Spring Pastel

Spring is a time of rebirth, with cool, fresh days becoming increasingly warm. new growth consists of bright fresh, acidic greens and yellows, which tend to cunter event overcast days. Pastel is ideal for this type of landscape work, because the colors are bright and kept fresh by direct marks, and by minimal mixing and layering. The cool, green pastel support is sympathetic to the subject, and lends an underlying color harmony to the work.

Combination Palette: Light Naples yellow, mid lemon yellow, lemon yellow, light black green, viridian, emerald green, light leaf green, mid leaf green, cobalt green, dark raw sienna, blue-gray, blue gray green, mid purple blue, light madder violet, cobalt blue, white.

Hue

Hue is simply another name for color. Red, yellow, and orange are all hues. Lemon yellow, cadmium yellow, and gamboge, all being yellow, are close in hue to each other.

Tint

A tint is a color that is mixed with white or, as is the case with watercolor, lightened by adding increasing amounts of water. The tinted range of any one color can run from the pure color at its maximum intensity through to white.

Shade

A shade describes a hue or color that has been darkened by mixing in a dark color like black or a second color, usually its complementary. This should not alter the color drastically, only darken, it. Like tints, the range of possible shades runs into hundreds, and stretches from the pure color through to black.

Tone

Tone describes a color's relative lightness or darkness, and is a term that can be used to describe both a tint and a shade. Lemon yellow is light in tone, while indigo is dark in tone - but if you add enough white to indigo, the resulting tint will be closer in tone to lemon yellow.

Value

This is another term that describes the lightness or darkness of a color. Lemon yellow has light value, while indigo has dark value. Value should not be confused with brightness (or intensity)

Beautiful Words

Beautiful Words
acrylic abstract art free video lesson by Peter Dranitsin

Through Golden Seas

Through Golden Seas
acrylic abstract art free video lesson by Peter Dranitsin

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The Medium is a Message

As you know it a line is a line is a line...or not. Every drawing and painting tool makes characteristic marks and affords a designer a specific kind of a visual language. The language of the tool has a powerful effect on an illustration's communicative value, not just on its visual qualities relative to other elements in a design solution.

Learn How To Paint Abstract Art Paintings by Peter Dranitsin

Learn How To Paint Abstract Art Paintings by Peter Dranitsin
Learn how to paint abstract art paintings with acrylic paint using modern techniques, tips & tools

ALL ABOUT ACRYLIC PAINTING PIGMENTS

THE FINEST quality pigments are used in the
production of artist-grade acrylic colors. To
begin, powdered pigments are dispersed into
water. Through varying methods (depending on
the manufacturer's equipment), the hydrophobic
pigment is forced into a homogenous mixture
with deionized water. The water molecules
surround the pigment, resulting in the formation
of an aqueous pigment dispersion, which is
then ready to be added to the acrylic paint
base. In the mixing vessel, a specially machined
stainless steel blade spins the mixture together.
The blade stirs the paint while the sides of the
vessel are continuously scraped to prevent the
edges from drying out and to ensure uniform
mixing. The blades are carefully machined to
mix varying paint formats and to accommodate
different mixing bucket sizes. Then, the additional
ingredients are added to the mix: surfactant,
defoamer, thickener, freeze/thaw stabilizer, fungi cide,
pH stabilizer, and biocide.
Each of these components is essential to the stability, longevity
end bacterial resistance of the finished product.
Once the paint has thickened and the ingredients
are fully merged, It is inspected by quality control
before being packaged. The quality control
procedures generally include comparing the new
paint with the standard (physical sample) for
color concentration, viscosity, and pH balance.
Once approved, the paint is poured into large
stainless steel hoppers attached to the tubing
and jarring machinery. The air- or machinedriven
mechanism pushes the paint from the
hopper into plastic jars, or metal or plastic tubes.
(Only small quantities of high viscosity paint are
packaged in tubes; quantities upwards of 4 or
5 fluid ounces are packaged in jars and pails.)
Then, the machine's many jaws crimp the ends
tightly to seal the tubes. All of the machinery
and tools used in the packaging of acrylics are
carefully washed and sanitized prior to filling to
prevent contamination from color to color.
Once packaged and sealed, most acrylics will
have a shelf life of six to ten years or longer.

Best tips on Hanging Art Paintings

Use these simple rules to create a functional interior design when hanging art:

1. When selecting a frame for art, coordinate it with the art, not the room. Frames should complement the artwork and allow it to be a focal point of the interior design.

2. If the work comes with a wire on the back, use a picture hanger and a nail of the appropriate weight. If there is not a wire and the art is heavy, you’ll need a picture hanger on each side to balance the weight. And while I love a Command strip for hanging temporary or very light pieces, never hang important or heavier framed items from them. I’ve seen too many people ruin great art that way.

3. Framing and hanging a group, series, or collection of art can be time consuming, but it makes a statement. When hanging the group, think of the collection as one large piece, then place the center of the group 60 to 66 inches from the floor. Also, in most cases, allow no more than 4 inches between individual pieces in a pairing or grouping.

4. Mixing styles and media in a room, or even in one group, can work beautifully. Try to group pieces that have a common thread, such as subject matter, the medium, the color palette, or the period. And be sure that the frames match or complement one another.

5. When hanging art over furniture, place everything close together so it looks cohesive when you enter a room. A good rule of thumb is to allow 6 inches or less between the art and the top of the furniture. Of course, use your judgement so people won’t hit their heads or knock into art when they sit or stand.


Recent Questions about Abstract Painting Videos, Techniques, and Contemporary Paintings in General

Q: Hi Pete Thank you for the very inspiring lessons I would like to know if you are having the canvas on a table og if you are uing an asel. The very wet painting never run down the canvas when you paint. Also how long does it really take you to make the paintings....not just 10-20 minuts I think :o Bedst regards Birgit Andersen
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A: Q: I would like to know if you are having the canvas on a table or if you are uing an asel. A: I usually have small canvases layed on the table and larger ones either on the floor or on the wall. Q: Also how long does it really take you to make the paintings A: it depends on the size of the painting and difficulty of the composition
Q: Is there a way to sort through the website for paintings and see only 36 x 48 or larger Thank you James
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A: You can simply submit your best offered price for immediate approval or if the painting has price next to it just click on add to cart button
Q: Do you have any art work to do with surfing or skate-boarding for a teenagers room
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A: I do not but I can always create one
Q: Mr.peter i have seen your work its osumme also artist i also want to work in abstract please help me out
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A: please visit my other website at abstractartlesson.com
Q: How do you draft your ideas Or do you even sketch and just go straight to painting Because your type of art is what I like to paint or at least would like to. Im use to being a perfectionist in my art but i dont want that. I want to challenge myself and just paint and plan as I go. How do you do it
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A: I would have a blurry idea of what I would like to paint and after choosing the colors I would outline the subject first if need be or just begin with the background colors and add elements as I go along
Q: Hi there I sent my e-mail to get your free videos but the link you sent does not work please send me another one. I love your paintings and the way you do it thanks for sharing.
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A: I have tried to email you back but your email blocks all incoming emails because the way your email is set up. This is the message I got when I tried to email you: Your email could not be delivered because the recipient is only accepting email from specific email addresses.

Understanding Abstract Painting Techniques, Tips on Painting with Acrylic Paint on Stretched Canvas

Q: Saw you on youtube and then checked out your site. Amazing Art! Do you make custom artwork? We are looking for an abstract painting in shades of purple, maybe with some brown . If so, what would be the costs? Iit would be for a large wall and we are open to ideas about one large piece or two or three pieces that go together. Look forward to your reply.
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A: cost would be determined based on the size of the canvas and the difficulty of the composition
Q: When you use a spatula, is it best to use heavy body paint and with a sponge, use soft body? And should I be using a dry sponge, because I'm getting bubbles in my paint? Best regards.
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A: Q:When you use a spatula, is it best to use heavy body paint and with a sponge, use soft body? - A: I only use soft body acrylics. Q: And should I be using a dry sponge, because I'm getting bubbles in my paint? Best regards - A: rinse the sponge periodically in clean water
Q: Peter, when you use a spatula, is it best to use heavy body paint? And do you use soft body paint for the sponge technique? Best regards. Jason
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A: Q: when you use a spatula, is it best to use heavy body paint? A: it really depends on your personal preference Q: do you use soft body paint for the sponge technique? A: I personally prefer to work with soft body acrylics
Q: I would like to buy the DVD's.. Can I?
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A: at this time I only offer streaming abstract art lesson video courses and tutorials on my other website at abstractartlesson.com
Q: Im not comfortable buying stuff online. Is any way of buying the gold package ata store?
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A: at this time I do not offer any DVDs with my art video lessons only through subscription on my other website at abstractartlesson.com
Q: I have subscribe to your side but I don't know how to see your videos. Please help
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A: please go to How It Works page on my other website at abstractartlesson.com and watch the tutorial video that will explain everything in details
Q: I am an artist myself, and I am interested in developing an affiliate website related to art and,more specifically, to abstract expressionist art. Do you have or would you be interested in affiliate marketing for your products? Jay Clapper
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How to create a stunning and creative use of special effects in acrylic abstract paintings on canvas

Q: Hi Pete. I love your art and i have watched your videos over and over again. Thank you for making these videos. I wonder if it is ok to use gesso for the white color in my paintings. Do you ever do that
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A: I do not substitute gesso for the colors but I don't see the reason why not to try and experiment with it.
Q: Hi Pete..your painting has inspired me a lot..i am a beginner in painting and want to do abstract..i tried painting with acryllic but they do not come out as yours. Could you please help me by telling what are the kind of paints and other materials that you use. Thanks a ton
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A: I prefer to use liquitex acrylic paint on primed stretched canvas. I also utilize sponge, brushes, wired brushes, glass, paper, anything that you can think of in order to achieve an eye catching acrylic abstract effect
Q: sirhow can i post my paintings to you in your http:abstractoriginalblogspot.com
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A: if you'd like to share your art on my blog just email your image and your message along with it to pdranitsin@gmail.com
Q: Hi Pete I wanted to ask what do you think is the best way for a traditional artist to make the transition into abstract.
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A: Good question, I would say first thing is to experiment with shapes, values, and other elements of a drawing or a painting distorting the appearance playing with the compositions getting them to appear abstract, unproportional. The idea is to look at the real objects and imagine what you can do to that or those objects making them look more interesting to a human eye.
Q: Hey Pete your artwork amazes me and I chose to do my art project on you and your art Im a freshman in highschool and it just so happens that my dads side of the family lives in Cleveland Ohio too. But one of the questions we have to answer about our artist in our project is what their birthplace Secondly have you recieved any awardsrecognitions Thirdly what are your favourite subjects to paint I hope you can help me thanks so much. yourartsamazing
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A: Hi there thank you for your interest and your questions. I was born in Saint Petersburg Russia. Couple of my recognitions worth mentioning are the art competition: http://www.jerrysartarama.com/Galleries/Turner-Gallery.html as well as having one of my paintings featured on wine labels: http://pondviewwinery.com/wine/2010_Harmony_750_ml My favorite subject to paint is pure abstract paintings that are composed of different textures and tones of colors that I have created using variety of different materials and tools. One of those paintings name is Hottest Fire. Good luck to you with your school project my friend!
Q: What inspired you to use the colours that you did
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A: I like to use bright colors that will make my painting to pop from its surrounding and warm the place up.
Q: Hi Pete just came across your painting techniques on youtube and its great to see how your paintings come alive. Quick question: do you paint the sides of the canvas as well Thanks Cheers Kartini
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A: HI Kartini, yes I do paint the sides of the canvas. I use pure black to cover the sides.

Online Abstract Painting Discussion on Abstract Painting Techniques with Acrylic Paint

Q: Sup Bro : Q1how do you make your paint colours from Q2 : what made you start painting Q3:what are your latest works of art 3 thank please reply
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A: Hi Mathew, I began to paint because I always enjoyed it. My latest works are the paintings that you will see on my home page of my website the most recent work is closer to the top. As far as the paint, I use liquitex acrylic paint. Thank you for your questions!
Q: whats your favourite material to use when creating your artworks thanks stevesteve :
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A: Hi Stevii, I love to work with sponge because it make the blending and color transition much smoother. Thanks for your question!
Q: what was you first ever inspiration when you first started and what is your inspiration now thanks em :
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A: Hi Emily, I have first began to paint at a very young age. My mother she is an art teacher and I got lots of inspiration from her. Thank you for your question!
Q: Hello Pete. First off I want to say your art is amazing and very inspiring to me. My main question is How do you show your painting as displayed in a living room or dining room like at the end of some of your videos What program do you use to do this and are there any tutorials that would help do that Thank you very much
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A: Thank you for your nice comments! To be able to do the display as I did on my website you need to be able to know Adobe Photoshop or pay someone to do this for you. There are many tutorials that you can also purchase or get free online to understand how to work with Photoshop.
Q: Hi peter let me just say after watching your videos I am truly amazed. Im a better drawer than I am a painter but ive starting to paint for a short while and i want to get better. When you paint how do you get your ideas and when you use the bottles what do you put in the bottles just paint alone or do you mix it with something else
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A: Hi Carolina, I usually come up with the idea to paint by deciding weather or not I want to create a subject in my paintings such as a tree, cityscape, landscape ... or just completely abstract elements. I use bottles to mix acrylic paint and water and that is it 60% paint and 30% water
Q: hey peter- first of all your work amazes me- and has inspired me a great deal- especially the videos and techniques- i am slowly learning to let myself go and follow where the painting takes me- this of course is alot harder to do than say- but i find it very relaxing- so to get around to my question- after about 7 yrs of slinging paint- i am getting alot of requests from friends and coworkers to paint them something and i enjoy the challenge - my question is this-- how do you go about pricing a particular piece since im new to all this- im honestly just trying to cover what monetary value i have invested- but then after seeing several artists work on line for sale- i wonder if i am selling myself short- any how- thanks for the inspiration- and your time- respects --- dave
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A: Thank you Dave for your comments. The pricing is a difficult subject for me. The way I determine the price is by the material cost first, and than by the difficulty and the outcome of the composition.
Q: Hi peter just wanted to say that you are an amazing artist and you paintings are beautiful i love them all I also wanted to ask how you figure out what to paint in the background of your paintings because im doing a painting of flowers and i need some ideas on how to give the painting more texture in the background.
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A: Thank you Isabel, I would first suggest to start experimenting by mixing paint together on a canvas using variety of tools (i.e. spatula, sponge, brushes ...). You can also try to experiment with different gels and mediums that is available to you in your local art supply store such as flow aid, glass beads, flakes to name a few.

Ten Ways To Create Modern and Contemporary Abstract Painting Forum

Q: Hi Peter Nice new paints you got out recently. As I started trying to paint recently one of the technique I wish I could learn the most is when you blend colors with your sponge the finish you get with it is incredible. Do you put pressure on it or do you get close enough just to say you touch it I dont know if its my type of paint bought the average quality since Im beginning or how I handle the sponge but I cant get paints to blend together they do mix sometimes but by spot only and my biggest problem is that the sponge often gets the paint off the canva when i use it and its a little wet. I can blend color but itll go from dark blue to white directly without a good transition since it takes off most of the paint and the transition is like 2mm between colors . Also I tried with the canva a little wet more wet and ... did a lot of experience. Thanks for your help and continue your impressive work I envy when you blend 2-3 color where there is a good thickness of paint and that the result is amazing Mickael
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A: Hi Mickael, thank you for your comments and your question. I would suggest you try quality acrylic paint such as "Golden Acrylics" and see if that helps you in any way,
Q: Hi Peter to start with i must say Im really impressed at how nice your abstract paintings ends in. Ive never wanted to paint before since I though and I know that I have poor skill in actually drawing detailed things. Seeing the way you paint and techniques you use got me so excited that I bought stuff the day after I saw your paintings and today I actually tried doing something similar to your Three Islands painting. The result is awesome for a first try and I must thank you for this. Also if you dont mind answering me I looked trough all the QA trying to find more about how u use your sponge for blending. I found it hard to get a good grading between colors as my paint would get on the sponge and spread on the painting more randomly then I thought thought it would gradually absorb the paint and make the gradient. I know the sponge should be wet but do you wring it out totally dip the tip before so few water drops falls on the paint Well I thank you again for giving me this will of painting just before Christmas and I wish you a good Holiday Season with your family and friends. I already cant wait to be back from my vacation to look at more of your videos : Thx again Mike
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A: Thank you Mike for your nice comment and your question. I use my sponge in different situation in a different kind of way. For instance if I need to remove some of the access paint I obviously rinse the sponge and make sure it is clean, in a situation where I blend the paint I do wring it out completely and begin dabbing on the canvas with it creating smooth transition. I hope I answered your question. Thank you again and Mary Christmas to you and your family!
Q: Hi Peter how do I keep the acryllics moist enough to work with on canvas as I live in a hot windy and dry region of Australia Also may I ask if you dilute your paint before putting on canvas. Perhaps you use a flow or retarder medium I truly admire your work and your talent. Thank you for sharing with your free videos. Best wishes from beautiful Kalbarri Western Australia. Chris
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A: Hi Chris, I usually wet the canvas prior work and I use plenty of water with my acrylic paint. I do not use any substitutes other than mentioned. Thank you for your question!
Q: Hello I was just wondering how you sign your paintings. I looked at a couple of them and there is no signature on it. So I asked myself do you sign them or not at all
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A: I always sign my paintings using permanent marker or black or white paint. Also I usually sign my paintings at the time when I sell each individual painting.
Q: Great work. Thanks for sharing. very interested in your new web site. Curious as to what type of sponges you use and where they are available Thank you Again
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A: You can use any regular sponge that you can find. For best results to achieving a smoother color blending transition try to use the sponge that is composed of smaller grains.
Q: Hi Peter I watched several of your videos and inspired through your art and technique I made a couple of paintings. Of course they are wayyy not as good as yours but Im quite happy with what I have created in the beginning. Nevertheless one of them is still too clean too structured.. and I have no idea what I could do to make it better - and what would ruin the whole thing. If Id mail you a picture could you maybe give me a hint or an idea what I could try in order to make the painting better That would be so great All the best Yve
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A: Sure absolutely send those in to pdranitsin@gmail.com
Q: How do you do it? I mean, do you just paint something spontaneously or do you have something in mind before you start? Because I love to paint, but I feel like I need to know what to paint before I start.
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A: Honestly to say in most cases I just begin to paint with blank mind and come up with something as I go along. Thank you for asking :)

Abstract Art is Complex to Explain Discussion Forum

For me, a big realization came when I saw that every image was the result of editing. A landscape or portrait or madonna and child- all edited out from a larger "picture" or arena.
A close look at a Franz Kline painting is a revelation of skill and this idea of editing and adjusting.
The reason I'm fascinated by this is that it seems to drive us to getting an essence into the material image that has no substance. It's like trying to capture the immense forces that created the hills in a landscape by rendering the hills as result of those forces instead of getting the contours visually right.
2 months ago• Like
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Joel Kahn • Check the links on my profile to see examples of my algorithmic math-based output. How do you think my work fits with these ideas about abstraction?
2 months ago• Like
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Peggy Kerwan • Thanks for all of this input. As a fairly new artist (6 years) who loves color, movement, texture, I paint mainly whimsical interpretations (all subjects and mediums). I share my art and others' art with many non-artist friends, several of whom struggle to "get it" when it comes to abstraction. I must say I'm not great at "explaining" it. Your comments have made me feel better able to do so. I especially like your comment, Hufreesh, and can't wait to share the slap with my buddies.
2 months ago• Like
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Catherine "Cathy" Shapiro • i'm a wordsmith too, so I love Stephen's commentary. Abstraction is like love ....and that's just as complex! Art itself is akin to the act of catching lightning in a bottle; You can't do that no matter how hard you try. :)
2 months ago• Like1
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Chris Myers • I could not find a way to edit a previous post with a URL that I will stop using, so that post is now gone. I am switching over to http://cribet.zenfolio.com for open edition artwork. I did not delete the post because this was not an interesting discussion! I find it very hard to classify a lot of my work and end up calling it abstract, but I do not really know if this is accurate or not. The question of what is abstract and what is not is always on my mind.

I guess I can define a couple things that help me decide if I should tag an image abstract. These are hardly definitions for abstract across all media, but they help. For my own works if their content is no longer clearly derived from the actual physical subject of the photograph and becomes more an expression of form or a fundamental geometric shape, then I call them abstract. I am less certain if there are those same forms and geometric shapes in the art, but the content is clear. My gut says that if mentally my imagination gets stirred up and I see other worlds and stories in images, then they are abstract. I do see the same sometimes in the oak tree portraits or fungi work that I do as well, but that is on a different level.

new online gallery: http://cribet.zenfolio.com
2 months ago• Like
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Jill Campbell • For me it is always important to try to keep some sort of connection or truth to the original subject - so it is often about trying to find some kind of balance between representation and abstraction. My aim is to develop a pictorial language which will enable me to make visible my own experience of being in the world in a way that has a universal sense and so can be communicated to others. Removing any obvious references to observed subject matter mean the paintings do not operate as windows.They become painted surfaces built with marks and colour that represent my personal expression of the relationship between self and the world.
2 months ago• Like1
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Stephanie Smith • It's great to see all of these comments! I recently participated in an abstract exhibit, where the curators asked us all to write a description of why/what/how we perceive abstract art - I'll start with my own writing, and if there's some interest, I'll keep adding other writings from the other artists. Just like this discussion, they ideas that have been flowing down from this one exhibit are eloquent and thought provoking.

The artists of the Renaissance did not invent human anatomy, but made strides to understand it by looking to and reflecting on information outside of what convention allowed. Similarly, abstract art is not a step out of reality, but rather a step into a greater reality. Creating and studying abstract works, is what examining a new species of exotic flower, excavating for ancient fossils, or mapping the inner apparatus of the human body is. Sometimes these acts are not so much beautiful as odd, or even gruesome; our imagination never truly anticipating their fragile existence. Yet, when our eyes fall upon them, their untamed presence provides a mind-altering experience. Observing their form, color, and behavior, augments our perspective of the natural world. Artists have long owned the resourcefulness to bring to forefront, forgotten, or veiled certainties - by providing intimate reports on compelling, but pre-existing realities.
1 month ago• Like2
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Jeffery Rowe • I believe art and the process of making art are the cultural DNA that makes us who and what we are, as individuals, a community and a society. While there are many endeavors that are rooted in creativity, to be considered "art" I feel the work has to speak to the audience in an intimate and primal way, if not it becomes just decorative. I am interested in exploring the notion of chaos and order and their relationship. That is why I introduce pseudo-geometric forms and lines in my work. My primary goal is to get the audience to think, and consider something they may not have considered. I occasionally try to provoke the thinking/questioning process with titles that may not be obvious choices. I also use hints of representational and symbolic elements in primarily non-representational pieces in an effort to challenge notions of reality. I tend to think that we compartmentalize our worlds into easily digestible boxes and by doing so edit out essential elements of the things we are boxing up. Once this is done we tend to believe these are absolute truths without further consideration. I hope to stimulate people into reconsidering these "truths". The world was flat and then it was round and now it is flat again. Art is a gift that allows us to accept these inconsistencies because our human realities are primarily a function of our perspective. Art aids and alters that perspective. I do not possess the arrogance to think I can necessarily alter that "reality" but , I may be able to influence the perspectives.
1 month ago• Like
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Stephanie Smith • A quote from a fellow artist - Alexis Mclean www.alexis-mclean.com

From Abstract Views Artists' Statements 2012

I consider all creation to bea na abstraction. I strive to let intuition and emotion flow into form when I paint. Defined images may appear although the whole comes from subconscious layers and raw emotion. The moment weh our inner cauldrons boil over and we leap into the void is already unique. We all relate to the sensations of being human, raw passion, loss gain, hoy...but this blank canvas underneath, the familiar human emptiness that arouses us to action because the only other option is death by statsis. This provokes me.
21 days ago• Like1
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Tony Reynolds • At one point in my scattered art education I heard or read that abstract art, perhaps it was more modern painting, was an attempt to create a new thing, a real object, not seen before. The painting was not to be understood as a window representing anything else (reality, emotion, etc) but rather that it was a thing of its own identity. Does this ring true?
20 days ago• Like
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Conn Ryder • Eegads ! To whom is it necessary that we provide this one all-encompassing definition of abstract art???? What an ominous task . . . . .tackled by a myriad of artists that have come before us . . . .and still no universal concurrence (that I’m aware of, anyway). It seems to me that the term “abstract” is/was to art, what “alternative” is/was to music (although even more wide-ranging). And under that umbrella term resides countless theorized sub-classifications to further describe the innumerable approaches to art (and the outcomes thereof) that fall under the canopy of “abstract.”

While it’s fun and thought-provoking to toss about various notions for the sake of discussion, for me personally, I don’t feel the necessity to do anything other than attempt to communicate the whats, whys and hows of my own work . . . and only then to those who are inquiring. (If someone told me it was their duty to educate me on the sport of boxing so that I might understand and appreciate it, I’d tell them to sod off because I prefer to remain blissfully ignorant!)

So for those who inquired, I would say my approach is to attempt to know my craft (see a great description from Brian Sommers above), know my materials . . . toss it in a pot (me . . .the vessel) . . . . .stir in a healthy dollop of emotion, a pinch of experiential and observational impact . . . . . and hope it manifests on canvas as something that resonates with me . . . . .and ideally, with someone else too.
Conn Ryder http://www.connryder.com
20 days ago• Like1
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Tony Reynolds • @Conn Ryder. I think the bigger purpose of this discussion is to explain what abstract art is to ourselves. Art (at least to me) is visceral but it is also cognitive at least at some level. The more we understand what we are involved in the more deeply we can engage.
19 days ago• Like1
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Conn Ryder • @Tony Reynolds -- Thank you for sharing your understanding of the purpose of this discussion with me. My comment was in response to Pete's initial statement in which he writes that abstract art will mystify some "therefore, it is necessary to define it, so that the viewer may decide for himself what is real and true." So I was addressing the notion of defining abstract art for the "viewer", and would reiterate my personal opinion that the whole of the term "abstract art" is too sweeping (or as Pete wrote "complex"). Therefore, while I understand artists enjoying a discussion about defining abstract art, when it comes to the viewer, I generally only strive to explain my own art to those with an open ear. Now, if someone said to me "I don't understand abstract art" and I found the person open to learning more about it, then certainly I'd attempt to share some explanation (even though I would have to clarify that artists' approaches, intent, message, etc. are as unique as snowflakes). But if a person said "I don't like abstract art" and I didn't sense they were open for it, I wouldn't personally feel it is necessary to change (or expand) their thinking). http://www.connryder.com
19 days ago• Unlike 2
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Lorraine Fossi • My work fluctuates between Abstraction and Landscape. I explain: Landscapes have always given us the freedom to enjoy dreamlike sequences back into the so-called real world. Abstract works are the tangible way to express the unreal. And they do so while awakening our consciousness; revealing the hidden by dismantling our own conventional and distorted views.
18 days ago• Unlike 3
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Sue Berce • I am a docent at Milwaukee Art Museum ( MAM) and give a ton of tours. I take everyone to the Contemporary Galleries first and have some standard thoughts...if you can say, "I don't get it, I could do it myself...it's about something!"
Motion and emotion...that's me in my work.
18 days ago• Like
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Herbert Murrie • When I'm asked, what is that or what are you trying to say, My pat answer is, look at it like you would look at a landscape. Does it move you, do you see something beautiful or ugly, is there any emotion that you feel when you look at this painting. I do and that's why it 's here for you to look at. Music is related to abstract in that you feel something, good bad or indifferent when you here it.
17 days ago• Like
Peter Dranitsin • Thank you everyone for such a great participation in this discussion about Abstract Art. I am really interested in reading your thoughts on this subject matter!
15 days ago2
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Liz Doyle • mmmmmmmmmm thought provoking
I tried to start adiscussion just now on similar lines (does it have to be pretty / balanced...) but got bogged down in a technical glitch with adding a link - oh well - I'm just learning here
Thanks for this discussion
14 days ago• Like
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Artist Arnold McDowell • Abstract is " ABSTRACT " it all come from A Old Man like Me = " Ab " was His Name and He Stract His Art Burch that had paint on it on A Painting that He Just Painted; it was A Landscape; So he "Stract" it Some More and said to His Sefl; " The Painting Looks A Lot Better; So what can I Name this New Painting ? He was Painting Out Side and went it His House; And Ask His Wife; She said I Like it too " Ab " so you just " Stract " it with Your paint Burch; YES; and She said Well Lets Call Your NEW Painting " Ab-Stract ".... " Ab " ; Was My " Great, Great, Great, Great "Grand-Pal" from The Appalachian Mountains; So thats how " ABSTRACT " got it Name; And She Help Name " The Great Smoky Mountains " Too; Artist Arnold McDowell at www.arnoldmcdowellart.com I LOVE to Paint and I like to Paint " Abstract Art " ; It is in A World of Art By its " Self " thanks Arnold.
12 days ago• Like
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Sue Berce • Here's the thing with me....in five years...four major surgeries, husband died, cancer, I almost died twice in 2011...no art training, but art spewed forth, first a tad realistic..then with every series of ten to twelve my head shifted...abstraction becomes real then disappears until it resurfaces...we have no control, really.
12 days ago• Like2
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Diane Mignon Morgan • The term "abstract art" is a generic term for anything that does not equate to realism. Historically abstract artists concentrated on an "aspect" that they wanted to convey in a painting or sculpture that was not possible with realism. I think with most of us today it is our own personal perception of a particular environment or feeling that brings us to exaggerate colors, overstate lines and forms to evoke our "own" personal emotion into the painting. If you explain this to people looking at your art they will be able to grasp it better. When someone is looking at one of my paintings I always ask them "How does this painting make you feel?" Abstract art may be complicated in form or execution but it does not have to be hard to understand. It is just an expression of the artist albeit overstated at times.
9 days ago• Like4
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Bryan Azevedo • when i get approached and some one tells me to define my art work i usually reply "there is nothing to explain". i feel the emotions people feel out of seeing my work in person is park of the magic in it. i mostly play with light, color and texture, but then again who doesn't....my works are based mostly on past emotions and experiences, and to have other find their own emotions in my work makes it all worth it to me.
8 days ago• Like1
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Artist Arnold McDowell • I Love " Abstract Art " and To Us Mountain People in East Tennessee; its NOT to Complex to Explain; When " Ab " My Great Grand Pal; painted The First One; He said I Like it; Its Like " Chicken Soup " The More I Put in it The Better it Looks; I am just A Old Painter; That Likes To Help All The Young Artist get all the Help thay Need To be A Good Artist; You-al can See My New; Abstract Painting Name of it is " Four Grasshopper's Singing to the Moon " at www.arnoldmcdowellart.com Abstract Art is ABSTRACT; Lets All injoy it and Eat More " Chicken Soup " as We Paint it; thanks Artist Arnold McDowell.
7 days ago• Like1
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Brad Cole • I think trying to explain Abstract Art as an entire discipline is more complicated than an Artist explaining the motives and choices made concerning their own work. I think an Artists intentions are the key factor when we describe to our viewers what Abstract Art is. For instance my motives are to challenge the human tendency to want to classify, and "put things in a box" even though my work is based 90% on primal instinct. Others motives might be to translate the idea of smell through visual stimulus. I think that because people are so determined to put everything into a category it's difficult for many to grasp the idea that Abstract art is most often manifested by creating through an individual Artists personal lens. So many interpretations and only one category - Abstract Art hah!
5 days ago• Like3
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Ursula E. Rettich • I do not agree with Bryan, Quote " there is nothing to explain" There is so much to explain - only words are not enough, that is why we paint in abstract, we see so much more then what everyone else is seeing, so we artists try to bring it out in and an "abstract" way. Not the incidental way of poring paint and see what comes out - no, we struggle and go beyond to try to explain what we see and feel in colour and shape and emotion
4 days ago• Like1
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Bryan Azevedo • Ursula - i think you need to reread my comment. I personally let the viewer's imagination take the course it wants on it's own instead of directing them in the way i think it should go. And to be completely honest, I never struggle with paintings, they come naturally to me (i'm blessed for this). I just prefer to have people see my works and go on their own voyage. I like to think of it as I build the land and you are your own tour guide.
4 days ago• Like• Reply privately• Delete
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Ursula E. Rettich • Sorry - I sometimesjust in my own world

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